Non Fiction

 

 

New additions to your libraries that will intrigue, broaden and educate

 

 

 

 

Tears of Rangi, by Anne Salmond

In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Beginning with a fine-grained inquiry into the early period of encounters between Māori and Europeans in New Zealand (1769–1840), Salmond then investigates such clashes and exchanges in key areas of contemporary life – waterways, land, the sea and people.

 

 

199 cemeteries to see before you die, by Loren Rhoads

A hauntingly beautiful travel guide to the world's most visited cemeteries, told through spectacular photography and their unique histories and residents. With more than 300 photographs, in this bucket list of travel musts author Loren Rhoads, who hosts the popular Cemetery Travel blog, details the history and features that make each destination unique. Throughout will be profiles of famous people buried there, striking memorials by noted artists, and unusual elements, such as the hand carved wood grave markers in the Merry Cemetery in Romania.

 

Transgender Children and Youth, by Elijah C. Nealy

Elijah C. Nealy, a therapist and former deputy executive director of New York City’s LGBT Community Center, and himself a trans man, has written the first-ever comprehensive guide to understanding, supporting, and welcoming trans kids. Covering everything from family life to school and mental health issues, as well as the physical, social, and emotional aspects of transition, this book is full of best practices to support trans kids.

 

 

The Diary of a Bookseller, by Shaun Bythell

Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Wigtown - Scotland's largest second-hand bookshop. It contains 100,000 books, spread over a mile of shelving, with twisting corridors and roaring fires, and all set in a beautiful, rural town by the edge of the sea. A book-lover's paradise? Well, almost ... In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books, introduces us to the thrill of the unexpected find, and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye.

 

Exposed: the dark side of the America's Cup, by Alan Sefton

The America's Cup has always been a hotbed of unbridled ambition, personal agendas, intrigue, spying and, more recently, hard-fought court cases - and that's before the boats even get out on the water to race. Exposed lifts the lid on this unique contest for the oldest trophy in sport and on the powerful men who have made it `the toughest game in town' and provides a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes of one of the most compelling and controversial contests in the whole of sport.

 

The Reassembler, by James May

When we look around our homes, sheds and garages we see an array of objects that spring to life with the click of a button or twist of a knob, and, most of the time, do exactly what we want them to. But how on earth do these objects work? If you really want to understand what something is then you have to understand how it works, and James May, presenter of The Grand Tour, is the man to help you find out.

 

 

Believe Me: a memoir of love, death and jazz chickens, by Eddie Izzard

When Eddie Izzard was six, he and his brother Mark lost their mother. That day, he lost his childhood too. Despite or perhaps because of this, he has always felt he needed to take on things that some people would consider impossible. In Believe Me, Eddie takes us on a journey which begins in Yemen (before the revolution), then takes us to Northern Ireland (before The Troubles), England and Wales, then across the seas to Europe and America, brimming with the surreal humour and disarming candor of his shows.

 

The Cause of Death, by Cynric Temple-Camp

Spontaneous combustion and exhumation, drug mules and devil-worshippers, a gruesome killing beneath the Palmerston North Airport control tower, a mysterious death in an historic homestead, rare diseases, drug-mules, devil-worshippers, a first-hand dissection of the infamous Mark Lundy case ... provincial pathologist Dr Cynric Temple-Camp lifts the lid on the most unusual stories of death and murder he has encountered during his 30-year career

 

 

From the stylish...

Scandinavia has long been the home of outstanding interior design and classic fashion brands and no one personifies modern Danish cool as well as fashion industry stylist, blogger and model Pernille Teisbaek. In Dress Scandinavian, Pernille offers professional tips on how to create a minimalist wardrobe and look, mix and match patterns successfully, adopt androgynous looks or new colour combinations, try out new materials and mix fabrics, plus plenty of timeless fashion advice such as a jeans-fit guide and essential Dos and Don'ts.

 

Lagom (pronounced 'lar-gom') has no equivalent in the English language but is loosely translated as 'not too little, not too much, just right'. Far from restrictive, lagom is a liberating concept, praising the idea that anything more that 'just enough' is a waste of time. Crucially it also comes with a selflessness and core belief of responsibility and common good. By living lagom you can live a happier and more balanced life, reduce your environmental impact, improve your work-life balance, free your home from clutter, enjoy good food the Swedish way, grow your own and learn to forage, and cherish the relationships with those you love.

 

...to the topical

Situated hundreds of miles from any other settlement, deep within the inhospitable desert of northern Kenya where only thorn bushes grow, Dadaab is a city like no other. Its buildings are made from mud, sticks or plastic, its entire economy is grey, and its citizens survive on rations and luck. Over the course of four years, Ben Rawlence became a first-hand witness to a strange and desperate limbo-land, getting to know many of those who have come there seeking sanctuary. In City of Thorns, Rawlence interweaves the stories of nine individuals to show what life is like in the camp and to sketch the wider political forces that keep the refugees trapped there.

 

Hillbilly Elegy tells us about J.D. Vance's journey from a young, troubled boy to a graduate of Yale Law School. He grew up in Appalachia – in a small town that was drug-torn and filled with misery. Part memoir, part historical and social analysis, Hillbilly Elegy is a fascinating consideration of class, culture, and the American dream.

A tough, absorbing read that offers insight into a marginal part of America in the context of the current political climate.